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Juvenile Justice Advisory Board (JJAB)

Kentucky’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Board (JJAB) is a state-wide citizen-based group created in an effort to meet the State Advisory Group (SAG) requirement established by the federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974, as amended.

Pursuant to the executive order and the requirements of the JJDP Act, the JJAB is required to develop and implement a statewide juvenile justice plan to be submitted to the federal Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) every three years and amended annually;  monitor compliance with the four core requirements of the JJDP Act; oversee federal funds received by the state under the JJDP Act; and make recommendations to the Governor and legislature on juvenile justice issues.

The JJAB oversees Kentucky’s OJJDP funding provided under the Title II Formula Grants Program, JAIBG Program, CJJPG Program and Title V Incentive Grants for Local Delinquency Prevention Program.

The JJAB is part of the Coalition of Juvenile Justice, a national organization including all State Advisory Groups, which is responsible for advising the President, Congress and the Administrator of  OJJDP on juvenile justice issues.

For administrative purposes, the JJAB was placed under the Kentucky Department of Juvenile Justice (KY DJJ).

JJAC Legislative Action

In leading Kentucky to full compliance with the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act of 1974, as amended, Juvenile Justice Advisory Board (JJAB) members encountered difficulties due to provisions of Kentucky’s juvenile code that:

  • Allowed status offenders to be securely detained for up to 43 days pending final disposition:
  • Allowed status offenders to be securely detained for up to 180 days for contempt of court;
  • Provided conflicting definitions of “habitual truancy;”
  • Provided no definition of “beyond control of school
    and/or parents,”  “detention,” “non-secure setting,” or “physically secure facility;”
  • Allowed youth to waive a pre-dispositional report without representation by an attorney;
  • Provided unclear timeframes for detention hearings;
  • Failed to include the constitutional rights established for juveniles in the defined procedures for conducting dispositional hearings for status offenders; and
  • Allowed status offenders who went AWOL from a non-secure alternative to be charged with a felony escape.

HB 296, which was proposed by the JJAB and passed by the 2000 General Assembly, brought Kentucky Law into compliance with the core requirements of the JJDP Act.

For more information regarding the JJAB, go to the JJAB Home Page.

 

Last Updated 9/29/2008
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